Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 05/2005

December 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Categories

What's Cooking?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

« House Burger and Farm Fresh Market (Nestor) | Main | Pho Truc Xanh- Vietnamese & Chinese in Escondido »

Sunday, 11 May 2014

Comments

caninecologne

I've never heard of City Chicken before. What an interesting backstory - Thanks for sharing this unique food memory. Happy Mother's Day to your dear mother! :)

Ed (from Yuma)

I remember city chicken - but I'm old! I thought it was just veal back from the days before chicken factories and when male dairy calves were turned into meat every fall. But I am just remembering a story I was told as I don't know if we ate it - but it did look like those at Siesels.

nhbilly

Interesting history, wow...

janfrederick

Wow. That's a new one for me. Interesting that pork would be cheaper than chicken.

Cathy

Thanks, cc. It's an interesting bit of East Coast/Depression Era food fact. (Mom says hello and thanks you also).
Mom told me it was mostly veal, Ed, but for variety in flavor, some pig was thrown in. City Chicken is still served in Polish Restaurants in the Detroit are and the 'kits' for cooking at home are available in most grocers and all meat markets there.
Thanks, Bill.
Yes, JanFrederick- pigs are slaughtered/fully grown at six months (fast), (cows are not at their peak weight until 18-24 months). Also pigs don't need to be pastured so use fewer resources; profit is quick. Hens produce eggs for around seven years; when chickens were bred, hens would be used for eggs and roosters kept alive only until around 12 weeks (to achieve an optimal size); not many available for eating back then.

nhbilly

This is definitely some good food history.
Makes me feel a little food smart.

Dennis

Thanks for sharing Cathy, this is a new one for me too. The images is making me crave tonkatsu sauce, but that's just me. ;)

Cathy

Thanks, Bill. I've always learned from Kirks posts and am happy to share what I know.
Thanks Dennis, now I will never look at a cracker crumb crust the same. You are so right.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

LA/OC Based Food Blogs

Food Blogs from Around the World

Site Meter