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Sunday, 18 July 2010

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Comments

Captain Jack

Hey Kirk,
just caught up on all the China posts so far. They as educational as they are entertaining.

Cheers,
CJ

Captain Jack

*are as*

kat

love love these posts!

ed (from Yuma)

Great post. I feel bad that I can't get good food like that in the United States also.

I never realized how different Chinese razor clams are from the ones in the Pacific Northwest. Thanks!

caninecologne

hi kirk - as always, i enjoyed seeing your food pix, especially the razor clams which i've never even tasted before. keep those china posts coming!

Kirk

Hi CJ - Thanks for reading! I'm glad you're enjoying the post.

Thanks Kat!

Hi Ed - I hope you're on the mend!

Hi CC - These razor clams were very sweet.

Sandy

Holy cow - the banquet was *lunch*?

I've never seen razor clams - very interesting.

So was the Laoshan cola served with ice?

Kirk

Hi Sandy - Yes, the banquet was for lunch. The Laoshan Cola was served slightly chilled, many folks believe that serving drinks ice cold is not good for your health.

AZ

Still no rice? My mouth is watering, but the thought of all that lovely food without a big bowl of steaming hot rice is just STRANGE especially the fish, ya gotta have rice with fish :o) !

bill

Yum razor clams...

Jason

A couple things struck me as being humorously familiar in your post. The first one being using numbers to denote each aunt/uncle. Given my father was number 9 out of 9, aunts and uncles were referred to numerically as well. The second is the snacks that come out all the time. When we were visiting family in Chongqing, we'd return to the family home after a huge banquet and they'd immediately break out the buns/fruits/etc. On one hand I don't want to be rude, but on the other hand I'm stuffed!!

Those crabs look great, looks like a blue crab cousin. How do they compare to the Shanghai hairy crab?

Mary

Oh man those clams looks so tasty! Yum yum!

Kirk

Hi AZ - Well, the porridge was made with rice! ;o) LOL.... It;s mostly breads up North.

Hi Bill - Double yum!

Hi Jason - The numbers were the only way I could keep track of everyone! ;o) The snacks are a required display of hospitality.... as is the responsibility of being a good guest and consuming them!

Hi Mary - I really enjoy razor clams.

J.tien

Hey Kirk,

Jeff again. If you like Tian Qi, I've got that growing too, mostly for the medicinal roots, but the leaves sure are tasty as well. It grows really easy, if you want a root sprout, you can have one.

Kirk

Hi Jeff - Wow, you've got everything! That's a very considerate and generous offer.... I'm only worried that we(I) have a notorius "black thumb". I'll send you an email.

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